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Advocacy Priorities

NAPSW Advocacy Priorities

During the 2018 conference the advocacy committee received approval from the board to focus on the following areas of advocacy for 2018: prenatal substance use, perinatal mental health and parity, ACA repeal and replace efforts (focus on essential health benefits & Medicaid expansion). While the vote does not exclude the organization from supporting requests on other topics, it is the hope of the committee to promote conversations related to these topics at a state, regional, national or international level.

Is your area of practice addressing one of this year’s advocacy priorities? If so, we’d love to hear about it! Send an email to advocacy chair Mandy Wannarka at [email protected] and it could be featured in greater detail in a future forum issue!

NAPSW Position Statement on United States Immigration Policy

NAPSW Position Statement on United States Immigration Policy

The National Association of Perinatal Social Workers (NAPSW) joins our fellow organizations including the American Psychological Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, National Association of Social Workers, National Perinatal Association and many others in their condemnation of the “zero tolerance” immigration policy being enforced by the current presidential administration.  It the duty and ethical responsibility to address this harmful policy and rally perinatal social workers to speak out against acts sanctioned by policy.

The NAPSW Code of Ethics (2017) deems it a social worker’s imperative to “seek to prevent and eliminate discrimination against any person or group on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, marital status, political belief, mental/emotional/physical disability and/or any other personal characteristic or status.” Social work’s ethical principles include: 1) service: to help people in need and address social problems, 2) social justice: to challenge social injustices, and 3) dignity and worth of the person: to respect the inherent dignity and worth of persons.  The current immigration policy of separating children from their families require social workers to acknowledge these acts as dismissing the dignity and worth of others and identifying this act as a social injustice.  NAPSW implores its members, and other social workers, to act providing service to those in need and address this current social problem.  Social workers’ ethical responsibilities require commitment to clients, promotion of their well-being and recognizing strengths in all cultures through cultural awareness and social diversity

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