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Advocacy Priorities

NAPSW Advocacy Priorities

During the 2018 conference the advocacy committee received approval from the board to focus on the following areas of advocacy for 2018: prenatal substance use, perinatal mental health and parity, ACA repeal and replace efforts (focus on essential health benefits & Medicaid expansion). While the vote does not exclude the organization from supporting requests on other topics, it is the hope of the committee to promote conversations related to these topics at a state, regional, national or international level.

Is your area of practice addressing one of this year’s advocacy priorities? If so, we’d love to hear about it! Send an email to advocacy chair Mandy Wannarka at [email protected] and it could be featured in greater detail in a future forum issue!

NAPSW Position Statement on United States Immigration Policy

NAPSW Position Statement on United States Immigration Policy

The National Association of Perinatal Social Workers (NAPSW) joins our fellow organizations including the American Psychological Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, National Association of Social Workers, National Perinatal Association and many others in their condemnation of the “zero tolerance” immigration policy being enforced by the current presidential administration.  It the duty and ethical responsibility to address this harmful policy and rally perinatal social workers to speak out against acts sanctioned by policy.

The NAPSW Code of Ethics (2017) deems it a social worker’s imperative to “seek to prevent and eliminate discrimination against any person or group on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, marital status, political belief, mental/emotional/physical disability and/or any other personal characteristic or status.” Social work’s ethical principles include: 1) service: to help people in need and address social problems, 2) social justice: to challenge social injustices, and 3) dignity and worth of the person: to respect the inherent dignity and worth of persons.  The current immigration policy of separating children from their families require social workers to acknowledge these acts as dismissing the dignity and worth of others and identifying this act as a social injustice.  NAPSW implores its members, and other social workers, to act providing service to those in need and address this current social problem.  Social workers’ ethical responsibilities require commitment to clients, promotion of their well-being and recognizing strengths in all cultures through cultural awareness and social diversity

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Coming Up June 27th: NAPSW President JaNeen Cross Moderates Congressional Briefing on Preventing Child Maltreatment of Infants from the NICU

Preventing Child Maltreatment of Infants from the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU): Strengthening Maternal-Child Bonds

Please join NAPSW President JaNeen Cross, who will be moderating this important congressional briefing that identifies strategies to prevent child maltreatment of infants from the NICU. The briefing will enhance awareness about NICU families, identify their unique needs and review program and policy solutions that promote positive parenting outcomes. The briefing will highlight policies and legislation that can support NICU families.  This event is held in collaboration with the Congressional Social Work Caucus.  It is supported by: NASW Foundation, CSWE, NAPSW, & New York Community Trust. Click here to download the flyer and learn more. Please RSVP by June 21st. 

Date:        June 27, 2017
Time:       12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Location: Cannon House Office Building (RM 121)
                 27 Independence Avenue SE
                 Washington, DC 20003

    
Click Here to RSVP 

NAPSW Partners With Little Lungs Campaign to Promote RSV Awareness

On April 21, 2017, NAPSW President JaNeen Cross participated in a RSV Patient Advocacy Ad Board to protect vulnerable infants from RSV. Promoting RSV awareness through the Little Lungs Campaign is identified as one of the next steps towards addressing this disease which is one of the leading causes of infant hospitalizations, and which disproportionately impacts preemies1,2.  The Little Lungs Campaign is about raising awareness of RSV, or respiratory syncytial [sin-sish-uhl] virus, particularly among expecting parents, new parents, and caregivers. Join the community of people helping to protect babies from this serious virus. Watch the video below to learn more about how to protect babies from RSV. Learn more about the campaign at the Little Lungs website and the Little Lungs Facebook page. Visit RSV Hospitalization to learn more about up-to-date key findings on RSV-related hospitalizations of preterm infants. Click here to read the results from the RSV Patient Advocacy Ad Board. 

  

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Important! Please Read NAPSW's ACA Repeal and Response Statement

NAPSW ACA Repeal and Response Statement (February 2017)

     National Association of Perinatal Social Workers (NAPSW) is a national professional organization comprised of perinatal social workers. NAPSW is committed to supporting individuals, families, and communities. It is equally devoted to expanding the role of social work in perinatal health. In order to achieve these goals, perinatal social workers rely on the values social justice, integrity, dignity and worth of persons. NAPSW values include social- economic equality and healthcare for all. As the 115th Congress transitions, under the leadership of President Trump, NAPSW will continue to advocate for the needs of individuals and families during the perinatal period. NAPSW will also continue to support the professional interest of perinatal social workers who provide psychosocial support services to families daily. 

     The Affordable Care Act (ACA) improved access to health insurance for many individuals and families. Medicaid expansion, through ACA, extended health insurance coverage for the most economically disadvantaged individuals and families to 33 states. ACA places focus on preventative care, improves access to out-of-network emergency services, and eliminates pre-existing condition exclusions. Healthcare reform, through the initiation of ACA, improves overall health and enhances the quality of our healthcare system. Healthcare reforms under ACA are consistent with social work values and ethics. ACA improves access to health care, supports health insurance for marginalized and oppressed groups, reduces the rate of increase for health costs, and improves patient protections and autonomy. NAPSW supports the direction of healthcare reform under the ACA provisions.

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Video Press Release from NCFIH

From Our Friends at the National Coalition For Infant Health:  Advocacy Video On Why Preemies Need a Human Milk Diet

 

***VIDEO PRESS RELEASE***

Infant Health Group Releases New Video “Why Preemies Need Access to an Exclusive Human Milk Diet” 

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NAPSW Opposes the Repeal of the ACA and Defunding of Planned Parenthood

NAPSW signs onto the ACA Women's Letter and opposes the repeal of the Affordable Care Act and defunding of planned parenthood. Repealing the ACA and defunding Planned Parenthood puts the health, well-being and economic security of women, particularly low-income women and women of color, in dire jeopardy. Other organizations have also signed on to the letter addressed to Senate Leader McConnell, House of Representative Majority Leader Ryan, Senate Minority Leader Schumer, and House of Representative Minority Leader Pelosi.  Click here to read the  ACA Women's Letter. 

Social Work Organizations Oppose Repeal of the Affordable Care Act

Read a joint statement from the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) and the Society for Social Work Leadership in Health Care (SSWLHC) regarding their position opposing repeal of the ACA.  Click here to download and learn more. 

Advocacy Opportunities

Advocacy Opportunities to Support Perinatal Health

NAPSW would like to present its members and the public with important information about advocacy opportunities that are in line with NAPSW's mission to support positive outcomes for every parent and every baby.

  • Tell Congress: WIC Works!  Sign MomsRising  petition to remind Congress that WIC is a vital program that improves health outcomes for women and kids.  Click here to learn more and sign.
  • Join the Office of Minority Health on Wednesday, February 15, 2-3p ET for a webinar.  Participants will learn how to identify implicit bias in various settings; recognize microaggressions, microassaults, microinsults, and microinvalidations; they will discuss how implicit bias as a contributing factor to health and healthcare disparitities; and mitigate implicit bias with de-biasing techniques.  Click here to learn more and register. 
  • The Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs Policy has released a document featuring recommendations for the new President and Congress entitles "Steps the New President and Congress Can Take to Improve the Health of Women, Children, and Families,: A 100-Day Policy Agenda. Click here to access this document. 

March of Dimes Zika Campaign Successful

Zika Funding Update — March of Dimes Campaign for Zika Funding Successful 

On September 28th, both the Senate and the House of Representatives passed legislation providing $1.1 billion in funding to combat Zika virus. President Obama signed it the very next day.  The March of Dimes expresses its gratefulness to the thousands of volunteers and supporters who signed their petition calling for Congressional action on Zika prevention.   Click here to read more and to learn about the #Zapzika Campaign.   

Visit the March of Dimes Action Center to learn about more advocacy opportunities.

Being A NICU Social Worker Never Stops

I want to start this article with a standing round of applause to the Providence, RI planning committee. Awesome conference and if you missed it, next year we will be in Portland, OR. I have attended several of the NAPSW conferences, in years past, and I always leave them feeling in awe of the planning committee’s hard work and have yet to be disappointed. So, really, let’s hear it for all planning committees past and future. Your dedication to this organization is not overlooked.

As social workers, we tend to wear many hats for our families, and at times can be a little protective too. Well, March of this year I acted as an advocate for a family. I hope I educated the physician a little too. Short story is this: Cute young couple has their first child, a boy. I have to say he was a gorgeous child. Shortly after birth, he shows signs of distress and is grunting and this is pointed out to the RN. The neo was consulted and conversations went on back and forth, until finally the decision was made that baby would be observed for a while in the NCIU. Back and forth, from room to NICU, the parents were ok, but just when they got comfortable; baby was either back in their room or back in the NICU.

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